Devblog #13 – Spreading Love

Hello there fellow Witch Trainer enthusiasts, LoafyLemon here! I’ve got some bits and bobs to share with you all today, so buckle up!

First off, I want to give a massive shout-out to everyone who chimed in on the recent polls and voted resoundingly in favour of spicing up our Patreon with exclusive behind-the-scenes content. Creating these posts is not just fun, it also serves as a good creative outlet to vent our frustrations and accomplishments. I truly appreciate the love and support you’re showing us. You’re the reason we put so much effort into making this project special! ❤️

Now, onto business! As some astute observers already deduced from previous hints scattered across our social channels and git repository, we’re currently knee-deep in polishing the final touches of the Luna Lovegood update. And lemme tell ya, it’s been quite the roller-coaster ride! 

One scene in particular, has been keeping me awake at night with its relentless demands. I’m talking about the grand finale of our intimate conversation system – the infamous ‘Talk to Me’ interaction. You know, the one where you, the dashing Genie, coax sexy responses from your loyal witch, Miss Luna Lovegood, depending on how naughty you choose to be. Well, this time, we have decided to spice things up, breaking the boring formula and add some visuals and reactions to it!

If you recall correctly, the last time we dropped some tantalizing teasers, we gave you a glimpse of Luna posing provocatively, splayed on the desk with legs and feet held up high in the air. Quite the image, isn’t it?

However, as always, behind every mesmerizing facade, there lies a sweaty, grubby artist, toiling away ceaselessly in his dark lair, struggling to translate those fleeting visions into tangible form.

I won’t bore you with tedious details about selecting suitable colours, tweaking minute details, or trying to get the feet right until my eyes bleed tears of blood (I already did that before! Although if you’re genuinely curious, feel free to drop a comment below, and I might indulge you later).

Fortunately, after countless failed attempts and plenty of cursing under my breath (maybe not so quietly sometimes), I think I finally cracked the foot-drawing code! Well, sort of. It’s not perfect, but hey, nobody said it has to be.

Of course, the previously showed images in the last dev-dump post are merely a rough draft, just a tiny fraction of the bigger picture. There’s still plenty of polishing left to do before it reaches its full potential. But rest assured, my dedicated team and I are pouring our hearts and souls into this project, ensuring it lives up to the lofty standards you’ve come to expect from us. This scene is the last big part of the update that we need to finish. Currently I’m working on the line art.

Line art is basically the skeleton of your drawing – it establishes the basic shapes, forms, and lines that define each element’s silhouette, volume, and proportion. Think of it as tracing the essential outline of the object you want to render, except with lines instead of pencil strokes.

This phase is arguably one of the most critical parts of the process since it determines whether the final product will look cohesive, balanced, and pleasing to the eye. A solid foundation makes it much easier to refine and polish later on.

For this specific project, I’m using *Paintool SAI 2* vector-based ‘Pen Tool,’ which allows me to draw precise, smooth curves and straight lines with various weight and colour settings. Using vectors instead of pixels has two significant advantages: first, they scale infinitely without losing quality, meaning you can zoom in or out as close as you want, and it will still appear crisp and sharp. Secondly, you can easily manipulate and adjust elements later without causing any distortions or artifacts.

In this case, I start by defining the main silhouettes (such as Luna’s body or the desk) using thick, heavy lines with darker colours, making sure they intersect correctly where necessary. Then I move onto secondary elements like hands, hair, clothes, etc., using thinner, lighter lines with brighter hues. Finally, I refine everything even further by tweaking angles, curves, and points, experimenting with line weights, line widths, line caps, line joins, and various other parameters until I achieve the desired effect. On top of the usual typical line art work, and because the scenes are supposed to be dynamically rendered in the game engine, I also must slice and split layers accordingly to fit within the engine’s scope for posing purposes. Once the line art is done, I will move onto shading, but more on that later.

And finally, before I wrap things up for today, I’d like to address one burning question that’s probably been nagging at the back of your mind like an annoying mosquito: “When can I finally play it?!”

Well, sadly, I can’t reveal our exact timeline publicly (gotta maintain some mystery, don’t I?) But I promise you this – we’re working hard as humanly possible to finish this monster ASAP so that you can feast your hungry eyes on all the steamy, sexy delights Luna and company have prepared for you!

Until next time, take care, stay tuned, and don’t forget – your support means everything to us! Thanks for sticking by us this far; here’s to many more exciting adventures together ahead!

Devblog #12 – Inspecting all the features

Sup y’all, Johnny here with another devblog.

Today, I’d like to discuss some upcoming content integrations into the game, including those already added and those currently in progress. Firstly, we bid farewell to the Luna “inspect body” Chibi images, replacing them with a fully CG scene. This scene will feature various poses and an additional secondary CG as a bonus. Currently, I’m working on posing this scene, which involves a total of 5 events, demanding my full attention but promising a rewarding outcome.

Another addition is the “masturbate for me” favour, where Genie tests Luna’s knowledge by evaluating her acquired knowledge. Players can even grade her performance. Furthermore, the Hermione “Cumslut” public request rework has been implemented. I’m delighted with the outcome, as it overcomes previous limitations, such as missed return events and restricted Tier 5 exclusivity. The revamped version ensures all events are accessible, with three events on Tier 5 and four events on Tier 6. Both tiers now include unique intros based on the favour’s initiation timing, and the evening return events have been significantly improved and expanded.

Additionally, I’ve introduced new nicknames for Luna in the upcoming content and added missing nickname chats for Hermione.

Regarding personal updates, I rediscovered my passion for gaming during the Christmas break and have continued playing on weekends. I’ve revisited the Mass Effect series, only completing half of the second game earlier. I must say, it’s been challenging to put it down. Each game offers something new and engaging. I enjoyed the planetary driving mechanics in the first game, while the second game captivated me with its compelling characters, intriguing storyline, and well-crafted quests. Currently, I’m playing through Mass Effect 3, but haven’t fully formed an opinion yet. However, I find the gunplay in this instalment to be the most enjoyable among the three games.

Devblog #11 – Bringing CG Scenes to Life in WTS

Hey there, Patrons and WTS fans! It’s LoafyLemon here, your friendly neighbourhood adult-game dev. Today, I’m going to give you a sneak peek into the process of implementing CG scenes (hand-drawn smut) in Witch Trainer Silver.

The process starts with sourcing the perfect CG images. We’re quite picky about this *cough* as are most of our users *cough*, as the quality and style need to match the overall aesthetic of the game as closely as possible, which I must emphasise, it’s not easy! Once we’ve conceptualised and drawn the scenes, it’s time to prepare them for integration. This involves splitting layers, resizing, cropping, and optimising the images to ensure they load smoothly within the game.

Next up, we need to decide where and when these CG scenes will appear in the scene they were planned for. It’s all about finding the right balance between storytelling and visual pleasure. We want to make sure that these scenes enhance the (s)experience without disrupting the flow of the game.

Once we’ve figured out the placement, it’s time for the programming part. I use SublimeText as my code editor of choice because it’s blazing fast, versatile, and has all the features I need. To integrate the CG scenes, I write scripts that trigger the scenes at specific points in the story. These scripts also handle the transition between regular gameplay and the CG scenes, ensuring a (usually) seamless experience for you lads and gals.

Of course, I wouldn’t be myself if I didn’t dive a little bit deeper into the technical side. Historically, I used my own python implementation for CG scenes, which turned out to be less than ideal because I was going against the current, fighting with the engine quirks, instead of following its workflow. Ren’py’s layeredimage feature plays a crucial role in this new process. For those unfamiliar, layeredimage is a built-in Ren’py feature that allows us to create complex and dynamic scenes by layering multiple images on top of each other. This is particularly useful for CG scenes, where we often need to combine backgrounds, characters, and various other elements to create a cohesive and visually appealing image, while maintaining the ability to switch parts of the image dynamically.

Promptly after the image definitions are implemented, it’s time to pose the scenes and see how things fit together. This is a time consuming process and has a huge impact on the overall quality of the scene, involving posing facial expressions, adding visual effects, and setting up animation timers. At times we also draw additional bits and bobs as we go through the implementation to fully flesh out the scene.

After the programming is done, we move on to testing. This is where we make sure everything works as intended and that the scenes are triggered correctly. It’s also a chance to fine-tune the timing and presentation of the CG scenes to ensure maximum impact.

Finally, once everything is working as it should, and we’re happy with the final piece, we upload everything to our git repository.

By the way, we really appreciate your support and feedback, as it helps us continue to improve and expand the game.

That’s a quick overview of how we implement CG scenes in WTS. I personally hope you enjoyed this behind-the-scenes look, and we can’t wait to share more updates with you in the future.

Stay naughty,
LoafyLemon.

Devblog #7 – Diving into the Loony bin

Lads and gals,
Johnny here with another dev blog post.

As mentioned in the previous announcement, we’re currently working on the next update, which puts focus on Luna.
I’ve been knee-deep in my writing hole the past couple of weeks, and I would like to share something about two of the events that will be included in the update.

The first one is the “Talk to me” event chain for her upcoming favour tier. I’m excited to say that now when we’ve got a dedicated artist, this event will also include a CG to make the scene more exciting.

The second event is another addition to the box-o-fun, but this time, it’s for Luna. This event will put Luna’s ability to compose herself to the test, as she receives a task to complete outside the office.

Aside from the event writing, I’ve also been writing chit-chats, and outfit dialogues. I’ve been having a lot of fun writing for Luna, as her quirkiness always leads to interesting and unexpected paths. I went over some finished work with Loafy the other day, and he had a good time reading through it, so I feel pretty happy about the work I’m putting out at the moment.

Moving on to the recently released Cho-focused update. I tend to stay away from mentioning major spoilers in these posts during development, but I figured I may as well delve into spoiler territory now that the update is out, so spoilers ahead.

The Cho x Tonks CG was an idea that I had a long “ass” time ago, before we had a dedicated artist, and I was so happy that we could finally do it. Back then, there were quite a few places where we had to hold back a little bit in terms of art, so one of our current goals is to add CG’s in other places as well. If you’ve got a suggestion in this regard, feel free to post them on our Discord.

I’ve got to admit, holding on to the reveal during the event where you summon Cho at the end of her content was a real challenge. I had numerous elements I wanted to incorporate, and I found myself revising substantial portions of it at least four times. Such as Cho coming to terms with the favour trading being more than just the means to an end, the big reveal about the luck potion, and then also putting focus onto the sexy stuff. I mean, what is this? A porn game?

There were also plenty of technical aspects and ideas that had us wondering if we could actually make them happen, but I’m stoked that everything came together smoothly in the end. One idea that evolved a couple of times was the CG of Cho masturbating inside the changing room. Initially, it was meant to just cut between the two CG’s, but then the idea of displaying both at the same time inside a thought-bubble emerged. When I mentioned that it would be funny if Genie’s cum landed on Cho inside the other CG, Loafy came up with the idea of letting players switch between the two CGs by simply interacting with the bubble. Once I knew we were going to be able to show both CG’s at the same time, I started thinking about how the Cho inside her mind would react, in contrast to the “real world”. I figured I may as well take advantage of being able to see both at the same time, and have that version of her give a clue as to what Cho was really feeling.

I also added a lot more sound effects for the deepthroat scene than I normally would. In my previous experiences of incorporating sounds, I’ve noticed that longer sound effects don’t mesh well when paired with still images. I’ve also stayed away from sounds that would give the character a certain “voice profile” such as moaning, since I’d imagine that the player has a certain voice in their mind already. That said, I figured that gagging sounds would still fit within those constraints while also evoking the sense of panic I aimed for in the scene. I haven’t received much feedback about this yet, so I’m curious to know if you guys think it worked well for the scene.

That’s about as much as I can share about the development for now. In my personal life, I got sick for a week or so, right after the last update, so I wasn’t really able to play too many games. But, I was still able to replenish my creative juices in other ways. I tend to watch Youtube videos or Twitch streams a lot more than Movies or TV-series, though. I wonder if anyone else is like this, where they don’t feel like they want to dedicate their full focus and watch a film. Maybe I need to put videos of people cutting foam or subway surfer next to it…

See you next time!

Devblog #4 – Am I testing the game, or is the game testing me?

Sup y’all, it’s me, it’s your boy Asmon– I mean, Johnny here with another devblog.

Things have been busy for us as we’ve just put out a couple of pre-releases of the upcoming version of Witch Trainer Silver. As of me writing this post, we’re working hard on ironing out any remaining issues you guys have found, doing QA, and adding the remainder of the content for the full release. If you’re one of the people who have been reporting bugs or feedback, thank you very much.

Since my last devblog post, I’ve been busy, adding new clothing for Cho, proofreading, writing, and reposing some events which used deprecated code.

In terms of clothing, I’m currently implementing items for Cho default clothing schedule, much like we’ve done for Hermione. We went for a more casual “Muggle” style look, and we’re pleased with the results, and hope you think the same. Some lewder pieces are, of course, being added as well.

I’ve also taken the time to run the entire game through a tool that we use called “LanguageTool”. I highly recommend using it if you’re a writer, as I’ve been using it for the past year or so. I probably spent over 24 hours at least, manually going each file, and although it’s been a mind-numbing task, the results have made it worth the effort.

Furthermore, I’ve also been going through one of Hermione’s shaming events and improving it. You know, the one where Hermione has to wear a sticky substance all day… And I’d like to move it into the “Public requests” menu for tier 5 and 6. That way, the player won’t easily miss the lower level variants. I’m uncertain if it will make it into the next release since Cho content is priority, but at least it’s coming in the future. If you read my last devblog, I also mentioned going through and touching up her other event dialogue. I’m taking my time, but as of writing this post, I’ve finished Tier 1-4, and also some side events such as the forest scene.

That’s about it when it comes to work. So, now it’s time for me to be self-indulgent and ramble for a bit. Sorry in advance.

Since Quidditch has been on my mind recently. I was, again, thinking about how silly of a sport it really is. Specifically, how the main part of the game barely even matters in the end, since catching the snitch is worth so many points. I mean, how fun is that for the audience? It would be like a game of football, but there are two players in the middle of the field that you can barely see, playing chess. You’re also allowed to use different brooms, so it’s all just pay to win! It’d be as if, in the real world, you were allowed to use different types of cars in a race!

That said, I still think Quidditch is quite fun, and a three-dimensional sport is certainly unique. For us, it certainly provided some pretty unique angles.

Anyway, time for me to jump back into the game-dev realm. I hope you think twice before letting me out next, as I’ll surely just end up going on another rant. Also, thanks again to those who have helped with testing this week.

Speak to you all soon.

Devblog #3 – Fantastic bugs and where to find them

Hey there chaps,

It’s been a busy few months for us, and a lengthy wait time for you, but we’re excited to announce that the conversion of the game from Ren’py 7 (Python 2) to Ren’py 8 (Python 3) is finally complete! We’re now in the final testing phase, and we can’t wait to share the new version of the game with you.

Before I get to the juicy stuff, I’d like to unleash my inner nerd 🤓 and talk a little about the process we went through, and how it affected the game and our workflow. I’ll try to keep it concise, but no promises.

One of the most challenging aspects of the conversion process was redesigning the internal systems without hurting performance or losing functionality. I have made some questionable design decisions before, that in retrospection I’m not proud of. Some were made due to time constraints and others due to my limited knowledge of the Ren’py engine. During the conversion process, I took the opportunity to address some of the aforementioned design and performance problems that had been plaguing the game ever since its creation.

For example, whenever the character call was made in the script, it would compute the clothing colours, layer structure, animation constructs, and only after that was done it would finally render the character image using a custom displayable. While the design was logical, unfortunately it was flawed at its base because I designed it as if it were being implemented in an entirely different game engine. The implementation was computationally expensive, the calculations had to be made every single statement for every single displayed character. Moreover, due to the nature of the engine and my misunderstanding of certain key features such as rollback, the performance degraded each time a rollback was performed. Uh-Oh. That doesn’t sound efficient, does it?

So, here’s what went wrong. Rollback is a great feature that other engines besides Ren’py implement, but the Ren’py implementation is pretty unique. Since Ren’py is based on Python, I assumed everything would work just like in good ol’ Python because why wouldn’t it, right. That’s the first mistake I made.

It is true that Ren’py supports the majority of Python functions, but it also implements its own subset of instructions and changes that modify how Python itself behaves inside the engine. To be able to showcase what went wrong, first I need to explain how memory is handled in Python.

Whenever you spawn a python object, the object reference and its attributes are being stored in memory until the program ends, or you delete the object, in which case it will be garbage collected (removed from memory) after python detects it is no longer in use. Sounds simple enough.

However, in Ren’py, each object reference and its attributes are being stored in memory twice. This is because rollback makes a copy of each object’s attributes and stores it in a log. This allows Ren’py to roll back the game and its code seamlessly, however, not without side effects. To reduce the number of side effects, each time you roll back the game, the statement you are rolling back to is being re-run, recreating the objects and their data. Some of you may already see the issue I’m trying to portray here.

The code responsible for generating character images was not intended to be run so frequently, so the faster you rolled back, or moved forward, it would not only waste CPU cycles, creating hitches and lags, but also bloat memory out of proportions in certain situations.

This brings us to another issue that I have been trying to fix for forever — Android devices crashing. For the longest time, I have been attempting to pinpoint the cause for crashes on certain devices, but for the life of me, I could not figure it out. The game worked absolutely fine on all my android devices, it was frustrating, I have been looking over the log files some of you were kind enough to send, and wondering… the numbers, Mason, what do they mean?

In the past few months, I was finally able to piece everything together. It turns out, the implementation of the rendering engine on certain phones is completely different compared to the implementation on my test devices. So, basically, this memory handling thing was a big headache, especially on Samsung devices. There were two main culprits: my code wasn’t quite up to snuff, and to make matters worse, Ren’py had a few bugs in the features I was using that were causing the same issue.

Initially, we have tried keeping the engine development apart from the main game development, unfortunately, during the implementation of some of the new content and features we had planned, we discovered game breaking bugs that stalled the process, and it put us in a conundrum.

We had two choices; We could either redesign the content plan and cut the problematic parts, risking encountering them again in the future, or, spend more time and resolve those issues once and for all, at a cost of a longer development cycle.

After lengthy discussions, we came to the conclusion that our only option is the option number two, and here are some of our reasons;

  • Performance issues:
    • Adding content would exacerbate the issue
    • Under memory-constrained situations, switching to full-screen would crash the game
    • Replay mode would take literal seconds to activate and switch contexts
    • The rollback performance was bad
    • The focus mechanism was causing stutters and slowdowns
    • Memory bloat
  • Python 2 deprecated in 2020:
    • Last update in June 2016
    • Issues with modern implementations and hardware
    • The Python 2 version of Ren’py will be discontinued eventually
    • Memory limitations
    • Suboptimal functions and syntax
    • Long list of known issues with no fixes
    • Lacking optimizations
    • Lack of support
    • Ever-increasing number of vulnerabilities
    • … and more
  • Android issues:
    • High memory footprint
    • Segmentation faults
    • Performance regressions
    • Memory and texture leaks
    • Lack of hardware acceleration in certain cases
  • Ren’py 8 and Python 3 offer numerous features that:
    • Enhance game development
    • Reduce downtime
    • Improve quality
    • Improve performance
    • Add modularity
    • Enable creation of user-defined statements
    • … and more

There are many factors to take into account, but the above list only scratches the surface. Unfortunately, we had to overhaul everything, which I was hesitant about, but I kept going because I knew it would stop you guys from complaining about performance. I’m joking. Or am I? 😗

Putting jokes aside, tackling this task has been a true behemoth, especially since I’m the only programmer on the team. But luckily, I’m surrounded by the most helpful and passionate group of people you could imagine making a porn game with. Whenever I hit a roadblock, I can just hit up Johnny or the others and talk it out, whether it’s coding problems, design issues, or just something as simple as waking up on the wrong side of the bed. Being able to discuss things or vent helps me gain new perspectives and ideas. Although, I should probably look into rubber duck development, as I’m already taking up too much of their time. 😆

Wrapping up. I’m pleased to report that all the aforementioned issues have been addressed, and we’ve noticed major performance improvements across all range of devices (that’s at least 3 computers and 2 phones 😉). I understand that not everyone has access to top-of-the-line hardware, so I’ve also included certain optional features that should enhance performance on the more capable hardware, such as an image cache slider that aims to improve performance at a cost of higher memory consumption. There are also numerous tweaks and enhancements that apply across all platforms. To address the performance issues within character image constructors, I implemented a solution where the results of the calculations are stored and cached. This allows for the efficient retrieval of previously generated valid combinations of character statements, saving both memory and cycles.

Of course, it’s not just about performance and bug fixing. We have also implemented a vast range of features that we hope you will enjoy in the upcoming weeks.

One of such features that wasn’t mentioned before is the expanded modding support that allows you to expand the game with ease and to the extent that was not possible before. You can add new characters, events, modify storylines and dialogues without limitations or increased complexity. I’m also working on adding documentation and modders resources.

I’d like to mention another feature we’re working on: the improved integration of wardrobe within the game. We noticed that gameplay and wardrobe elements were a bit disconnected, so we’re actively trying to address that by adjusting events and adding more checks where needed. But that’s not all.

We’re also working on revamping and adding clothing support to chibis. We plan to cover all quest-related outfits and clothing pieces, but we’ll need to discuss the rest further before I can give you a more detailed answer.

But enough about technicalities. Now, if you are still awake reading this post, it’s time to share the juicy part you all have been waiting for — the release date.

If everything goes as planned, the next update should be released… queue the drumroll, sometime next week. Yep, you heard it, the wait time is about to be over boys and girls!

Given the extensive nature of the changes and the use of an unreleased version of the Ren’py engine, we will label this update as an alpha version until both our codebase and the Ren’py codebase are stable enough. We’ll likely keep the older update live alongside the alpha update until that point, but we will need your help with testing if you’re willing.

The plan is to release updates in quick succession, fixing reported bugs and adding some new content we haven’t included yet, alongside some other changes we hope to reveal publicly later. We will make an announcement as soon as we have further information to share.

Once the bugs are squashed and the update becomes feature-complete, only then we will move onto working the next update, which should take much less time to develop now that we’ve addressed all the issues we’ve had with the project and our workflow. No worries, we don’t plan doing any more maintenance. 😛

If you’re reading this, congrats – you’ve made it to the end of the post! Before I go, I just wanted to thank you all for your support and patience. We wouldn’t be here without you, and there’s no better feeling than seeing others enjoy your hard work.

LoafyLemon out.

P.S. We will be posting some teasers in the upcoming days, stay tuned!

Devblog #2 – Can writers have a backstory?

Hey everyone, Johnny here with another devblog.

Today, I want to share a bit about what I’ve been working on lately, and even though nobody asked, I thought I’d mention some of the media that has inspired me and my writing.

As you may recall from the last devblog, I’ve been playtesting the game as part of our effort to port it to the Python 3 version of Ren’Py. It’s been challenging, but it has given me the chance to really dig into the game and “touch up” the writing.

For example, I’ve been refining Hermione’s behaviour during certain public and personal events to ensure that her attitude remains consistent for that tier. This includes things like strengthening the reasons why Hermione would ever agree to dance in front of Snape, her attitude towards kissing other girls, and how she reacts to Genie using derogatory terms. Previously, the player could change her nickname to a derogatory term, yet one of the events featured the same term being used and Hermione acting negatively towards it. There may still be a few instances where this inconsistency is present, so if you happen to spot one, please let me know.

Regarding writing improvements, I’ve mainly been adding more dialogue options and checks, as well as additional and improved writing during events. My current goals are to make the world feel more alive, let the player participate more in what Genie says, and add further replayability. I’ve learned a lot since I went over the writing last time, so hopefully everything should now feel even more interconnected.

Some examples that I’ll share today include a new section for the “Dance for Snape” event. On each replay of the event, Hermione now takes the player’s choices into account and lists all the new things she’s learned about him. The other dancing variants of this tier are being improved as well, mainly by adding more variation between the different choices. In the future, I’d also like to add even more variations for higher tiers.

I’ve added more checks during the event where Hermione opens up to Genie and Tonks about the naughty behaviour of her peers. Now she’ll mention the most current Quidditch events that she has witnessed and participated in.

That’s about it for work, but as I mentioned at the start, I’d also like to go on a bit of a nostalgia trip and talk a little bit about the media that has influenced me and my writing. It might not be interesting to everyone, but it may explain Genie’s dumb tangents and stupid humour, as I put a lot of myself into his character.

When I was growing up, I was mostly drawn to games that didn’t base themselves too much in reality or take themselves too seriously, such as the Ty the Tasmanian Tiger, Ratchet and Clank, Sly, Jak and Daxter, Rayman, and Tony Hawk’s Underground series. Some of you may have already noticed what is similar about these games. No, they don’t all have furry characters in them (I added Tony Hawk just so you couldn’t make that comparison). What makes them similar is that they were all filled with funny one-liners and humour, some of which were even fourth wall breaking.

Once I got older, I started reading the Harry Potter books and playing the games. They’ve always been a big part of my life, during both happy and sad times. When it comes to the games, I’ve played just about all of them, including the versions for the various platforms. I say “just about” because I haven’t played the Deathly Hallows games, and I haven’t had the chance to pick up Hogwarts Legacy yet.

I could probably elaborate on the games, books, and movies for ages, but I’ll leave that for another post. For now, I’ll just list my favourite games in order from best to worst. Just in case there’s at least one other nerd like me who has played them all. I’ll specify a console when there are multiple games for the same school year. I also won’t list the handheld games:

  • 3 (PS2)
  • 2 (PS2)
  • 1 (PS2)
  • 3 (PC)
  • Quidditch World cup
  • Lego Year 5-6
  • 5 (PS2)
  • 6 (PS2)
  • Lego Year 1-4
  • 4 (PS2)
  • 2 PC
  • 1 PC

Comedy has always been something that I’ve been drawn towards in every media, and especially for TV and movies. My favourite movies growing up were the ones starring Jim Carrey, especially The mask and Ace Ventura. I also enjoyed and still enjoy cartoons a fair bit, I’m currently watching the Aladdin series and Star Wars The clone wars. Funnily enough, Aladdin was my favourite Disney film growing up, perhaps due to the Genie character providing the type of comedy relief I enjoy.

Of course, there’s also other adult media that has inspired my work, but this post is starting to take up far too many inches on my screen, and I’m feeling a bit insecure about that. So to end this devblog, I thought I’d pose a question for you all as I made have had a realisation when typing this up. Does anyone else remember Courtney Gears from Ratchet and Clank 3? Is it just me, or does her body type look a bit similar to the characters in… Never mind… Forget I said anything.

Devblog #1 – Hello World

Hey everyone! We have some updates on the progress of our game development process. To begin with, we’ve decided to start making development blog posts to make up for the radio silence, which we apologize for. Progress reports aren’t always possible to make when we’re in the middle of the development, and they don’t always contain information about what we’re struggling with or the actual immediate changes we’re making.

Another reason why we’ve decided to start making these development blog posts is because we understand that not everyone has the expertise to read and understand the code changes we’re making, even if we use Git and everyone can view our progress. By writing these posts, we hope to make our development process more accessible and transparent for everyone interested in the game, so you can get a behind-the-scenes look at our work. We’re excited to share our journey with you and hope you find these updates helpful and informative.

We also want to inform you that we plan on making these development blog posts bi-monthly, so you can expect to hear from us more regularly. We want to keep you all in the loop and share the progress we’re making in the development process.

Moving on to the game development progress, Johnny has been working hard on the writing, while I’ve been focusing on porting the game to the newest version of Ren’py and Python. This has been a long and challenging task, involving testing, fixing bugs, converting CGs, and refactoring the code. However, we’re finally starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel, and all the hard work has been worth it.

During the playtesting phase, Johnny has been able to elevate the writing even further. We’re making adjustments to Hermione’s public events to match her personal events and adding more event checks. For instance, during early Hermione favours, you can ask her to dance for you. However, when you ask her to do more than dancing, the event will fail. Once you’ve progressed further, and you’re finally at a point where she accepts, she will still act surprised by the request, which didn’t make sense. So, we’re adding more checks like this to make the writing less generalized and the reactions more genuine.

We want to make sure the game feels authentic and immersive, so we’re asking for your help. If you notice something that feels off, even if it has already been established, please let Johnny or me know.

In other news, I’ve made a Discord bot to automatically post embeds on our Discord server whenever we create a new post on the website. This way, we don’t have to repeat the same thing on every website we manage.

We appreciate all the support we’ve received so far and are excited to continue working on this project. Thank you for your patience, and stay tuned for more updates!

P.S. Johnny had a chicken for lunch today.
P.P.S Johnny says it was a joke and to not include it in the post, well, it’s too late for that now!